Fourth Annual Summer Invitational

Gordy Fine Art and Framing Company will celebrate First Thursday, June 1st from 5 – 8 pm with an opening reception for the gallery’s fourth annual Summer Invitational. The exhibit will feature work by emerging area artists who will be on hand to engage with viewers. Light refreshments will be served and the public is invited to attend.

The Summer Invitational is designed to introduce some of the most interesting, new work our region has to offer by exclusively exhibiting artists not currently represented by GFAF. This refreshing shift in the gallery’s routine brings together artists from throughout Central Indiana and beyond. The exhibit will be on view for two months through the end of July, offering visitors an extended opportunity to experience fresh, new art from beyond the Muncie scene.

26
May 2017
AUTHOR braydee
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All About the Land: Pastels of David Dale and Poetry of Andrew Hubbard

Odyssey

by Andrew Hubbard

Imagine effortless perfection.

Imagine this river
Not making a wrong turn
In a thousand years,
Reflecting every leaf and cloud
With passion and precision
Nourishing the deep roots
Of the silver maples
Who offer tribute in return:
Showers of golden leaves
Gifted to the river current
Wherever it may venture.


All About the Land: Pastels of David Dale and Poetry of Andrew Hubbard

Artist David Dale, well-known for his deep concern for the environment and natural resources, has partnered with Andrew Hubbard, who has published two books of poetry reflecting on the connectivity of humanity and nature. Their project is titled All About the Land: Pastels of David Dale and Poetry of Andrew Hubbard.  An exhibition will open to the public at Gordy Fine Art and Framing Company on September 7, 2017.  Proceeds from sale of the work will benefit Red-tail Land Conservancy.

“We at Gordy are so pleased to be a part of this project to highlight and support the important work of Red-tail,” said Gordy owners Barbara and Carl Schafer. “We are equally pleased to be the venue to welcome David Dale back to Muncie.”

Hubbard and Dale met in Nashville, Indiana where he moved after his retirement from David Dale Designs several years ago. They were neighbors and active members of the creative community there.  Dale has since moved back to Muncie and asked Hubbard to partner with him in the creative community here.

Their art is inspired by visits to Red-tail lands, now totaling more than 2,600 acres at 36 sites in East-Central Indiana counties. “I work in the studio, but painting outdoors is my passion,” said Dale. “For each image, there is a poem by Andy sharing the same subject. Sometimes my painting responds to his poem, and other times, his poem responds to my painting. They will be exhibited side by side.”

“The experience of working in these remarkable settings is intensely rewarding,” Hubbard adds. “We hope that the works will enable you to participate in the vibrancy of a special place and time.”

Red-tail Land Conservancy’s mission is to preserve, protect, and restore natural areas and farm land in east central Indiana while increasing awareness of our natural heritage.  “We hope Dale and Hubbard’s portrayals of these preserved sites will inspire Hoosiers to appreciate the splendor of nature and join Red-tail in its mission,” said Red-tail’s Education and Outreach Coordinator Julie Borgmann.

“I look forward to any opportunity to walk in our woods, and love to accompany David and Andy on their visits,” said Executive Director Barry Banks. “I can’t wait to see the Red-tail renderings that will emerge in the coming months.”

David Dale is well-known in East Central Indiana and beyond for his years as an interior designer, and now paints full time. He studied art at the Fort Wayne School and Museum and has taught in the Ball State University School of Art. His major exhibits include, River Odyssey, Two Artists Follow the Wabash, and Oakhurst Gardnens through the Seasons. He has received numerous awards in competitions, including those hosted by The Hoosier Salon, Indiana Heritage Arts, Richmond Art Museum, and Minnetrista.

Andrew Hubbard holds degrees in Creative Writing from Dartmouth College and Columbia University.  For most of his career, he worked as Director of Training for a number of major financial institutions. He is a well-known speaker on the topic of corporate training and has authored three books and dozens of articles on the subject. He has published two books of poetry, Things That Get You, and The Divining Rod, both through Interactive Press.

Framing in the Arts and Crafts style from the early 20th Century

The Arts and Crafts Movement from the early 20th Century valued things made by hand. This frame was built up from raw wood. It is a solid oak frame typical of the style with simple overlap joint and black stained buttons on the corners. Here it is receiving its final wax coat.


 

My favorite moments in our shop come when we don’t have what the customer wants. Recently, a client came to us with two photographs. He was an enthusiast of the Arts and Crafts Movement of the early 20th Century and asked what frames we had to offer in that style. It soon became obvious that he was looking for something very specific that I could only make by hand with a custom finish. The two photographs were views inside the Roycroft Community which was a reformist group of craftworkers near Buffalo, New York.

The group was strongly allied with the Arts and Crafts Movement, known for simple elegance and high quality craftsmanship. Because the movement was a reaction against mass production, it was always very important to see evidence of the human hand-work in unusual joining techniques, carving, inlays, and small imperfections. As my discussion with the client progressed, it was clear that only a handmade frame would be acceptable.

What resulted is a solid oak frame with simple overlap joints and black stained buttons on the corners which I lovingly tapped with a heavy hammer to show the human touch.

We are glad to now continue offering this frame. There are many Arts and Crafts style homes in this part of the country where frames like this would be entirely appropriate.

— Carl Schafer, Owner

03
Mar 2017
AUTHOR braydee
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First Thursday – RITUAL by Erin Colleen Williams

Gordy Fine Art & Framing Co. will celebrate First Thursday February 2nd from 5 – 8 pm with an opening reception for Ritual, an exhibit of new drawings by artist Erin Colleen Williams. The artist will speak briefly about her work at 6:15 PM. Light refreshments will be served and the public is invited to attend.

Working both two-dimensionally and three-dimensionally, Williams’ uses interdisciplinary media and methods to examine the relationship between the conscious self and hypothetical past, present, and future. She cites scientific principles, contemporary culture, interspecies communication, and material intelligence as the primary influences that inform her creation of alternate realities using physical objects. Her work also examines western museological and archaeological practices in order to perpetuate instances of awe and wonder in the physical world.

Ritual, William’s latest body of work, is a series of drawings which contemplate the interdependency of human, animal, and object. Inspired by narrative illustrations, mythology, memento mori, and historical occult imagery, the work visually describes intangible emotions such as loneliness, revulsion, sacrifice, compassion, and the universality of death. The word “ritual” also refers to the act of daily drawing, a sometimes mindless repetition of pattern and line, which is a meditation in itself.

Erin Colleen Williams received her MFA from Virginia Commonwealth University in Material Studies, focusing in metalsmithing and sculpture, and her BFA from Syracuse University in Metalsmithing. Williams worked as a senior lecturer in Metalsmithing / Jewelry at the University of the Arts and Moore College of Art in Philadelphia, PA; and as an Adjunct Professor in Jewelry / Metalsmithing at VCU. She also coordinated the Graduate Programs of Museum Studies, Fine Art and Book Arts / Printmaking at the University of the Arts. Prior to relocating to Indiana in 2016, she worked as the Graduate Coordinator of Fine Arts at the University of Pennsylvania. Her artwork has been exhibited at the Philadelphia Art Alliance; Delaware Center for Contemporary Art, Wilmington DE; Art Space, Raleigh NC; Travers Gallery, Seattle, WA; and more.

Ritual may also be viewed through Saturday, February 25, 2017 during regular business hours: Monday through Friday, 9 am – 5:30 pm, Saturday, 9 am – 3 pm. Gordy Fine Art and Framing Company is located at 224 East Main Street, next door to Muncie Civic Theatre. For more information, call 765-284-8422.

28
Jan 2017
AUTHOR braydee
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First Thursday – Annual Salon Show

Gordy Fine Art & Framing Company will open its Annual Salon Show on First Thursday, December 1st from 5 – 8 PM. Included in the exhibit will be work by all 25 artists represented by the downtown Muncie gallery. Artists will be on hand to chat and answer questions. The reception will also celebrate the first year of business under new owners Carl and Barbara Schafer.

A feast for the eyes, the GFAF Annual Salon Show celebrates Muncie’s robust fine art scene as dozens of paintings, prints, and pottery pieces fill the gallery. Both new and familiar work will be on view by area artists Kim Anderson, Brian Gordy, Jim Faulkner, Sarojini Johnson, Jan McCune, Alan Patrick, Martin Price, Carol Strock Wasson, and more. This unique exhibit allows for works of art to be taken away at the time of sale, giving patrons the opportunity to consider art in the show for holiday decorating and gift giving.

“There is no other GFAF exhibit that appropriately and visually conveys the impressive amount of artistic talent Muncie and the rest of East Central Indiana supports. The Annual Salon Show is both a testament to that talent and the community of art patrons that continues to reinforce our efforts to grow the local arts scene,” offers Gallery Manager Braydee Euliss reflecting on her tenth year of involvement with exhibitions at Gordy Fine Art & Framing Co.

Carl and Barbara Schafer will introduce the exhibit and artists in attendance during a brief talk at 6:15. Light refreshments will be served and the public is invited to attend.

29
Nov 2016
AUTHOR braydee
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Shop Small, Shop Local, Shop Handmade

 

During the days following Thanksgiving, Gordy Fine Art and Framing Co. will observe Black Frame Friday and Small Business Saturday. We will celebrate both days with 40% off all black custom frame mouldings and 15% off original pottery, jewelry, and prints by our represented artists.

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21
Nov 2016
AUTHOR braydee
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Framing, Gallery, News

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Desperately Seeking Charles

Gordy Fine Art and Framing Company will celebrate First Thursday, November 3 from 5 – 8 pm with an opening reception for Desperately Seeking Charles, a small group exhibit featuring current work from five Ball State University’s MFA Glass candidates with a wide range of glass forming techniques represented. Light refreshments will be served and the public is invited to attend.

Desperately Seeking Charles features a collection of 3-D work in which each artist individually interprets the material properties of glass through their own perspectives and inspirations. The work explores techniques involved in the making of traditional, vessel forms as well as contemporary, glass-based sculpture.

“The exhibition title is derived from a philosophical approach. Desperately Seeking Charles, is our pursuit to find a voice and style of expression with glass. We are all desperately seeking a niche of our own within the contemporary glass community,” explained to group of MFA candidates.

Evan Burnette, Dylan Martinez, and Andrew Schultz are third year candidates who are currently working toward their creative research project which will be exhibited in spring of 2017.

Allyssa Burch and Lily Rawson are second year candidates who are currently exploring material investigations and processes within their studio practice.

A brief talk at 6:15 will introduce the exhibit and artists in attendance.

29
Oct 2016
AUTHOR braydee
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FROM BEYOND – ALIENS IN MUNCIE

Closing Reception for Monkey Thunder VI
Saturday, October 29th 1 – 3 pm

Gordy Fine Art and Framing Company will host FROM BEYOND: ALIENS IN MUNCIE, an artist guided costume and video making event, this Saturday, October 29th from 1 – 3 pm as part of the closing reception for their current exhibit, Monkey Thunder VI. Light refreshments will be served and the public is invited to attend.

FROM BEYOND: ALIENS IN MUNCIE invites the public to join Karl Erickson as he explores the following questions:

Are you, or is anyone you know, an ALIEN?
Have you ever felt like you were a being from OUTER SPACE visiting THIS PLANET?
Are you an Intergalactic Visitor on a quest for Inner Peace?

If so, Karl Erickson is here to help. As part of his ongoing project about finding inner peace through outer space, Erickson will guide guests as they make their own wearable, alien creations as well as their own short videos of enlightenment-seeking extraterrestrials encountering Muncie and one another for the first time.

Dedicated space and time for costume design and execution will be available in the downtown gallery Saturday afternoon 1 – 3 pm. Costume making materials will be provided, but guests are encouraged to bring their own materials as well, especially clothing and headwear to serve as a base for each creation. Participants will be documented in their completed costumes.

In addition to costume creation, participants can also collaborate with Erickson to generate their own short video scenes about aliens seeking transcendence. All raw material produced will then be uploaded to The Cloud and available to participants to edit their own short science-fiction films. The final result will be a series of thematically linked short science fiction videos exploring enlightenment. These videos will be posted online and screened at future Monkey Thunder events.

Karl Erickson a visual artist focusing on the moving image with video and animated gifs. His subject matter includes science fiction, environmental issues, motivational language and temporal/spatial dislocations. Featured in the Monkey Thunder VI video exhibit for ArtsWalk, his recent video project, We Could Be Transcendental Apes, is a re-imagining of sci-fi B-movies as quests for enlightenment. A version of the multi-part work was shown at Field Projects Gallery in New York City, where Erickson was the 2015 Resident Artist. He earned his BFA in Sculpture from Wayne State University and his MFA in Studio Art from The California Institute of the Arts. He is the Ball State University School of Art’s new assistant professor of Digital Media and Computer Art.

24
Oct 2016
AUTHOR braydee
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Monkey Thunder VI

Monkey Thunder VI reigns at GFAF Gallery for the month of October. We’ll celebrate with an opening reception for Monkey Thunder VI, a group show featuring work from more than 20 artists that will spill over into Muncie Civic’s Black Box Theatre. Light refreshments will be served and the public is invited to attend. Music will be provided by Mark Perretta.

Monkey Thunder is an annual art coup perpetrated by experimental and interdisciplinary artists working locally and regionally including current faculty and students at Ball State University School of Art, as well as guest artists from across the country. Organized and curated by GFAF Gallery Manager Braydee Euliss, Monkey Thunder VI will be a month-long event with the opening reception coinciding with ArtsWalk, Downtown Muncie’s most popular First Thursday of the year.

In addition to the work displayed at GFAF gallery, Monkey Thunder VI includes video and other time-based artwork on view in Muncie Civic’s Black Box Theatre under the direction of Maura Jasper, visual artist, filmmaker, and Assistant Professor of Intermedia Art at BSU. This ‘side-show’ has been a Monkey Thunder favorite and is a one-night-only event, offering a rare exhibit experience for both the artists and the audience.

Monkey Thunder VI may also be viewed in the Downtown gallery through the end of September during regular business hours: Monday through Friday, 9 am – 5:30 pm, Saturday, 9 am – 3 pm. Gordy Fine Art and Framing Company is located at 224 East Main Street, next door to Muncie Civic Theatre. For more information, call 765-284-8422.

05
Oct 2016
AUTHOR braydee
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Monkey Thunder Reigns for ArtsWalk

Join us for ArtsWalkthe largest First Thursday event of the year, October 6th from 5 – 9 pm with an opening reception for Monkey Thunder VI, a group show featuring work from more than 20 artists that will spill over into Muncie Civic’s Black Box Theatre. Light refreshments will be served and the public is invited to attend. Music will be provided by Mark Perretta.

Monkey Thunder is an annual art coup perpetrated by experimental and interdisciplinary artists working locally and regionally including current faculty and students at Ball State University School of Art, as well as guest artists from across the country. Organized and curated by GFAF Gallery Manager Braydee Euliss, Monkey Thunder VI will be a month-long event with the opening reception coinciding with ArtsWalk, Downtown Muncie’s most popular First Thursday of the year.

In addition to the work displayed at GFAF gallery, Monkey Thunder VI includes video and other time-based artwork on view in Muncie Civic’s Black Box Theatre under the direction of Maura Jasper, visual artist, filmmaker, and Assistant Professor of Intermedia Art at BSU. This ‘side-show’ has been a Monkey Thunder favorite and is a one-night-only event, offering a rare exhibit experience for both the artists and the audience.

30
Sep 2016
AUTHOR braydee
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Transformative Power of Masks

Transformative Power of Masks: A Jonathan Becker Performance

Join us on Saturday October 1st from 1-3 pm for the closing reception for Facing Humanity: A Parade of Masks and a special performance led by Jonathan Becker.

Our September artist Jonathan Becker and his theatre students will perform an original skit featuring some of the masks currently on view in the gallery. The skit illustrates the transformative power of masks and will be a fitting conclusion to Jonathan’s exhibit Facing Humanity: A Parade of Masks.  The performance will take place next door to Gordy’s in the Studio Theatre inside the Muncie Civic Theatre complex. Those attending should plan to enter the theatre prior to the 1:00 pm performance. Afterward, all will be invited to the Gordy Gallery where the masks are displayed for refreshments and casual conversation with Jonathan and the students.

26
Sep 2016
AUTHOR braydee
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Gunther Cartwright: Closing Reception + Artist Talk

From photographer Gunther Cartwright:

A constant question about my photographs: How do I get to photograph the places I do? I do a lot of travelling and driving. I imagine that my personal carbon footprint is higher than I would like it to be. Basically, there are four main ways I get access to scenes that I photograph:

1: Informed Serendipity – Prepared Luck
2. Written Negotiated Permission
3. Oral On-location Approval
4. Stealth

I will respond to this question during my August 27th Gallery Talk. However, just as an example, if you look at my website,  you’ll see 21 photographs. Of those, 15 were made with Informed Serendipity and 5 with Written Negotiated Permission and 1 Stealth. Of 25 photos for the exhibition 21 were with Informed Serendipity, 3 with Written Negotiated Permission and 1 with Stealth. The overall pattern is that `”serendipity” shines its face on me.

That being said, allow me to take you through one time where I attempted to do the “legally correct” thing to acquire written permission for photography. It did not work out so well! I was given an opportunity to go to San Francisco. They have a orange bridge there that I could photograph in my style. In doing visual research of looking at 100’s of Golden Gate Bridge photographs made by professionals, most were very beautiful postcard photos, with the exception of some “better” photos, which were made by National Geographic photographers. I wasn’t interested in going there to shot yet another “postcard” – I was going to make an “Industrial Blues” photo!

To do that I knew that I needed to acquire permission to get very close to the bridge, perhaps even in it. I wrote a letter to the Public Affairs Director of the Golden Gate Bridge, Highway and Transportation District to inquire as to what levels of access a “Fine Art” photographer can obtain in order to photograph the bridge. At that time a website was not available. An email of inquiry was sent along with a mini-portfolio of my work with supporting critical assessments of my work.

A week or so later I received back an email from the GGBHTD stating that “yes” a commercial permit can be purchased from $10,000 to $2,000 per day, depending whether the image(s) are made in non-public or public spaces on the GGB. In addition, I was informed that getting access to the tower tops would be impossible during the time I planned on being at the GGB because of construction and maintenance issues. That’s exactly where I wanted to be in order to get an image with my visual point-of-view!

I thanked the GGBHTD for their response and I reiterated my request that my work was not “commercial” but “Fine Art” oriented and what cost for a permit of that type. The response was that it would be $2,000 per day from any non-public site as well as signing over the copyright to the GGBHTD.

They want me to pay $2,000 per day and relinquish my copyright. No way!
I’ll take my chances and photograph from the public areas. -No permit required.

Six weeks later I was at the GGB. Good weather! Just “scoping” the place out, let me know that using a tripod on the walkway is dangerous. Too narrow – too many bikers going quite fast – Not many vantage points that weren’t a “postcard” – This will be difficult. The next two days, poor weather. On the fourth day (good weather) I thought I would stop by the GGBHTD office and just introduce myself. I parked in the public visitors parking lot. I walked along the public sidewalk toward the GGBHTD office.
On the way there, in the visitor’s lot, right next to the sidewalk was placed a newly delivered communications dish for the GGB. It was sitting on a pallet still steel strapped in place. It was painted the GGB orange tone and the shadow of an adjoining tree was falling upon the dish. It caught my eye against the blue sky with just a hint of the GGB in the corner of my mental frame. This was a photograph waiting to be made by me! I proceeded to set up my camera and tripod on the public sidewalk with a low point of view. As I was framing and adjusting my shot, people walking by (including GGB employees) would stop and wonder what and why I was photographing. I even allowed some GGB employees to look through the camera. They were so surprised by my framing. “Very clever”, they commented. After making several frames and finishing, I proceeded to he GGB office looking for the GGBHTD Public Affairs Director. I was told that she would not be in for several more hours as she was on a film shoot up at the north end of the GGB. Upon leaving, I left behind my business card and proceeded to search out more possible photos during this brief moment of good light. The day ended with a few more frames being exposed but nothing like the communications dish photo. I knew this was special. And most importantly I knew it would not be a “postcard”!

Several weeks later, in Rochester, NY, I processed my digital files from that shoot. I really wanted to study the communications dish photo. I liked what I saw. In my heart it lived beyond the moment of capture. The position of the dish, in a foreground dominant stance, occupying 80% of the frame pleased me. The photo wasn’t perfect – as much as I liked the tree shadows in the dish, they were a difficult read – the small portion of the GGB in the upper right of the frame was a bit too small for me as well as several millimeters too close to the edge of the dish. Oh well, not much I could do about that now. I was able to reduce the appearance of dust and dirt on the dish by careful use of the “clone tool”. That helped the dish to have a bit more visual presence. The more I worked with the image, the more I liked it.
I was so excited by it, that I decided to share my “cleverly” framed photo of the GGB with the folks at the GGBHTD Public Affairs Office. I sent them an electronic file.

What happened next totally caught me off guard! The next day I received an email from the Public Affairs Director of the GGBHTD admonishing me
for making this photo! “What right did I have to make this photo without a GGB permit? You must remove this from your files and not show this photograph!” “We will follow legal avenues should you disregard our request.”

I could not believe what I was reading. I was expecting a congratulatory response on how “clever” of a photo this was (IMHO). I was shocked.
I felt like a criminal! Clearly, an unexpected turn. What right did the GGBHTD have to tell me to eradicate this photo from my files? For a while,
I was dumbfounded by this. After some careful consideration of the facts of the event and in speaking with friends, I came to the conclusion that I did not do anything improper or illegal. The GGBHTD had no authority to order me to desist from using this photograph. I made this from a public sidewalk. I did not use an extraordinary lens to “visually sneak “ onto GGBHTD property (there are laws against using a telephoto lens to gain visual access to subjects in a private place, from public property) – Think “paparazzi” ! Even the GGBHTD should be able to note that I used a wide-angle lens from a very close distance. The dish was on the outside edge of their property abutting a public sidewalk.

I informed them of those facts and indicated that I felt I had done no wrong and had not trespassed in order to make this photograph. In addition, this image was made for Fine Art exhibition purposes. It is NOT a commercial image and really has no commercial viability.

We live in complex times!

22
Aug 2016
AUTHOR braydee
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