Desperately Seeking Charles

Gordy Fine Art and Framing Company will celebrate First Thursday, November 3 from 5 – 8 pm with an opening reception for Desperately Seeking Charles, a small group exhibit featuring current work from five Ball State University’s MFA Glass candidates with a wide range of glass forming techniques represented. Light refreshments will be served and the public is invited to attend.

Desperately Seeking Charles features a collection of 3-D work in which each artist individually interprets the material properties of glass through their own perspectives and inspirations. The work explores techniques involved in the making of traditional, vessel forms as well as contemporary, glass-based sculpture.

“The exhibition title is derived from a philosophical approach. Desperately Seeking Charles, is our pursuit to find a voice and style of expression with glass. We are all desperately seeking a niche of our own within the contemporary glass community,” explained to group of MFA candidates.

Evan Burnette, Dylan Martinez, and Andrew Schultz are third year candidates who are currently working toward their creative research project which will be exhibited in spring of 2017.

Allyssa Burch and Lily Rawson are second year candidates who are currently exploring material investigations and processes within their studio practice.

A brief talk at 6:15 will introduce the exhibit and artists in attendance.

29
Oct 2016
AUTHOR braydee
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FROM BEYOND – ALIENS IN MUNCIE

Closing Reception for Monkey Thunder VI
Saturday, October 29th 1 – 3 pm

Gordy Fine Art and Framing Company will host FROM BEYOND: ALIENS IN MUNCIE, an artist guided costume and video making event, this Saturday, October 29th from 1 – 3 pm as part of the closing reception for their current exhibit, Monkey Thunder VI. Light refreshments will be served and the public is invited to attend.

FROM BEYOND: ALIENS IN MUNCIE invites the public to join Karl Erickson as he explores the following questions:

Are you, or is anyone you know, an ALIEN?
Have you ever felt like you were a being from OUTER SPACE visiting THIS PLANET?
Are you an Intergalactic Visitor on a quest for Inner Peace?

If so, Karl Erickson is here to help. As part of his ongoing project about finding inner peace through outer space, Erickson will guide guests as they make their own wearable, alien creations as well as their own short videos of enlightenment-seeking extraterrestrials encountering Muncie and one another for the first time.

Dedicated space and time for costume design and execution will be available in the downtown gallery Saturday afternoon 1 – 3 pm. Costume making materials will be provided, but guests are encouraged to bring their own materials as well, especially clothing and headwear to serve as a base for each creation. Participants will be documented in their completed costumes.

In addition to costume creation, participants can also collaborate with Erickson to generate their own short video scenes about aliens seeking transcendence. All raw material produced will then be uploaded to The Cloud and available to participants to edit their own short science-fiction films. The final result will be a series of thematically linked short science fiction videos exploring enlightenment. These videos will be posted online and screened at future Monkey Thunder events.

Karl Erickson a visual artist focusing on the moving image with video and animated gifs. His subject matter includes science fiction, environmental issues, motivational language and temporal/spatial dislocations. Featured in the Monkey Thunder VI video exhibit for ArtsWalk, his recent video project, We Could Be Transcendental Apes, is a re-imagining of sci-fi B-movies as quests for enlightenment. A version of the multi-part work was shown at Field Projects Gallery in New York City, where Erickson was the 2015 Resident Artist. He earned his BFA in Sculpture from Wayne State University and his MFA in Studio Art from The California Institute of the Arts. He is the Ball State University School of Art’s new assistant professor of Digital Media and Computer Art.

24
Oct 2016
AUTHOR braydee
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Monkey Thunder VI

Monkey Thunder VI reigns at GFAF Gallery for the month of October. We’ll celebrate with an opening reception for Monkey Thunder VI, a group show featuring work from more than 20 artists that will spill over into Muncie Civic’s Black Box Theatre. Light refreshments will be served and the public is invited to attend. Music will be provided by Mark Perretta.

Monkey Thunder is an annual art coup perpetrated by experimental and interdisciplinary artists working locally and regionally including current faculty and students at Ball State University School of Art, as well as guest artists from across the country. Organized and curated by GFAF Gallery Manager Braydee Euliss, Monkey Thunder VI will be a month-long event with the opening reception coinciding with ArtsWalk, Downtown Muncie’s most popular First Thursday of the year.

In addition to the work displayed at GFAF gallery, Monkey Thunder VI includes video and other time-based artwork on view in Muncie Civic’s Black Box Theatre under the direction of Maura Jasper, visual artist, filmmaker, and Assistant Professor of Intermedia Art at BSU. This ‘side-show’ has been a Monkey Thunder favorite and is a one-night-only event, offering a rare exhibit experience for both the artists and the audience.

Monkey Thunder VI may also be viewed in the Downtown gallery through the end of September during regular business hours: Monday through Friday, 9 am – 5:30 pm, Saturday, 9 am – 3 pm. Gordy Fine Art and Framing Company is located at 224 East Main Street, next door to Muncie Civic Theatre. For more information, call 765-284-8422.

05
Oct 2016
AUTHOR braydee
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Monkey Thunder Reigns for ArtsWalk

Join us for ArtsWalkthe largest First Thursday event of the year, October 6th from 5 – 9 pm with an opening reception for Monkey Thunder VI, a group show featuring work from more than 20 artists that will spill over into Muncie Civic’s Black Box Theatre. Light refreshments will be served and the public is invited to attend. Music will be provided by Mark Perretta.

Monkey Thunder is an annual art coup perpetrated by experimental and interdisciplinary artists working locally and regionally including current faculty and students at Ball State University School of Art, as well as guest artists from across the country. Organized and curated by GFAF Gallery Manager Braydee Euliss, Monkey Thunder VI will be a month-long event with the opening reception coinciding with ArtsWalk, Downtown Muncie’s most popular First Thursday of the year.

In addition to the work displayed at GFAF gallery, Monkey Thunder VI includes video and other time-based artwork on view in Muncie Civic’s Black Box Theatre under the direction of Maura Jasper, visual artist, filmmaker, and Assistant Professor of Intermedia Art at BSU. This ‘side-show’ has been a Monkey Thunder favorite and is a one-night-only event, offering a rare exhibit experience for both the artists and the audience.

30
Sep 2016
AUTHOR braydee
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Transformative Power of Masks

Transformative Power of Masks: A Jonathan Becker Performance

Join us on Saturday October 1st from 1-3 pm for the closing reception for Facing Humanity: A Parade of Masks and a special performance led by Jonathan Becker.

Our September artist Jonathan Becker and his theatre students will perform an original skit featuring some of the masks currently on view in the gallery. The skit illustrates the transformative power of masks and will be a fitting conclusion to Jonathan’s exhibit Facing Humanity: A Parade of Masks.  The performance will take place next door to Gordy’s in the Studio Theatre inside the Muncie Civic Theatre complex. Those attending should plan to enter the theatre prior to the 1:00 pm performance. Afterward, all will be invited to the Gordy Gallery where the masks are displayed for refreshments and casual conversation with Jonathan and the students.

26
Sep 2016
AUTHOR braydee
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American Impressionist Frame Reproduction

Antique Frame Reproduction

Our shop recently completed an antique frame reproduction project for one of our museum clients. The original frame is an American profile simplified from the American Impressionist style with hand carved arrow fletching motif in the corners. The panel (flat area in the middle of the frame rails) is chip- carved giving it an undulating texture with periodic crescent shapes. Because the new frame is small (for a painting 8” x 10”) the client asked us to make without the crescents.

Am. Impressionist Original

We began by purchasing raw wood moulding with an American Impressionist profile and then we carved off some decorative elements to match the original frame. Once the frame was built, we made the chip-carve using a spoon shaped chisel. We drew the corner decorations by hand and rubbed the drawing onto the frame. This gave us a guide for the actual carving which was completed with chisels of various shapes as well as razor knives.

modifying-stock-moulding

carving-ornaments

completed-raw-carve

After applying several layers of gesso and red bole to smooth the surface, we gilded the frame with 22K gold which resulted in a very bright finish that needed to be toned and antiqued to match the original frame. This step was perhaps the most satisfying because the frame took on the illusion of age that is appropriate to the painting it was built for.

bright-gold-after-gilding

A final coat of wax deepens and saturates all the layers that have been applied. The two frames can now be exhibited side-by- side without a hint that one is brand new.

final-frame-with-applied-antique

15
Sep 2016
AUTHOR braydee
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Monkey Thunder Reigns: MT6

Monkey Thunder started five years ago as an art coup of sorts with little to no guarantee of staying power. And after 5 glorious iterations, Monkey Thunder is back with its second public event! MT6 will be a month-long exhibit and the opening reception will coincide with ArtsWalk, Downtown Muncie’s biggest First Thursday of the year, October 6th from 5 – 9 PM.

In keeping with the frantic, last-minute origin of MT, Gallery Manager Braydee Euliss will be throwing together this 6th installment over the next few, furious weeks.

Deadline for artwork submissions is Midnight Tuesday, September 20th.
Guidelines: Monkey Thunder 6

09
Sep 2016
AUTHOR braydee
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Gunther Cartwright: Closing Reception + Artist Talk

From photographer Gunther Cartwright:

A constant question about my photographs: How do I get to photograph the places I do? I do a lot of travelling and driving. I imagine that my personal carbon footprint is higher than I would like it to be. Basically, there are four main ways I get access to scenes that I photograph:

1: Informed Serendipity – Prepared Luck
2. Written Negotiated Permission
3. Oral On-location Approval
4. Stealth

I will respond to this question during my August 27th Gallery Talk. However, just as an example, if you look at my website,  you’ll see 21 photographs. Of those, 15 were made with Informed Serendipity and 5 with Written Negotiated Permission and 1 Stealth. Of 25 photos for the exhibition 21 were with Informed Serendipity, 3 with Written Negotiated Permission and 1 with Stealth. The overall pattern is that `”serendipity” shines its face on me.

That being said, allow me to take you through one time where I attempted to do the “legally correct” thing to acquire written permission for photography. It did not work out so well! I was given an opportunity to go to San Francisco. They have a orange bridge there that I could photograph in my style. In doing visual research of looking at 100’s of Golden Gate Bridge photographs made by professionals, most were very beautiful postcard photos, with the exception of some “better” photos, which were made by National Geographic photographers. I wasn’t interested in going there to shot yet another “postcard” – I was going to make an “Industrial Blues” photo!

To do that I knew that I needed to acquire permission to get very close to the bridge, perhaps even in it. I wrote a letter to the Public Affairs Director of the Golden Gate Bridge, Highway and Transportation District to inquire as to what levels of access a “Fine Art” photographer can obtain in order to photograph the bridge. At that time a website was not available. An email of inquiry was sent along with a mini-portfolio of my work with supporting critical assessments of my work.

A week or so later I received back an email from the GGBHTD stating that “yes” a commercial permit can be purchased from $10,000 to $2,000 per day, depending whether the image(s) are made in non-public or public spaces on the GGB. In addition, I was informed that getting access to the tower tops would be impossible during the time I planned on being at the GGB because of construction and maintenance issues. That’s exactly where I wanted to be in order to get an image with my visual point-of-view!

I thanked the GGBHTD for their response and I reiterated my request that my work was not “commercial” but “Fine Art” oriented and what cost for a permit of that type. The response was that it would be $2,000 per day from any non-public site as well as signing over the copyright to the GGBHTD.

They want me to pay $2,000 per day and relinquish my copyright. No way!
I’ll take my chances and photograph from the public areas. -No permit required.

Six weeks later I was at the GGB. Good weather! Just “scoping” the place out, let me know that using a tripod on the walkway is dangerous. Too narrow – too many bikers going quite fast – Not many vantage points that weren’t a “postcard” – This will be difficult. The next two days, poor weather. On the fourth day (good weather) I thought I would stop by the GGBHTD office and just introduce myself. I parked in the public visitors parking lot. I walked along the public sidewalk toward the GGBHTD office.
On the way there, in the visitor’s lot, right next to the sidewalk was placed a newly delivered communications dish for the GGB. It was sitting on a pallet still steel strapped in place. It was painted the GGB orange tone and the shadow of an adjoining tree was falling upon the dish. It caught my eye against the blue sky with just a hint of the GGB in the corner of my mental frame. This was a photograph waiting to be made by me! I proceeded to set up my camera and tripod on the public sidewalk with a low point of view. As I was framing and adjusting my shot, people walking by (including GGB employees) would stop and wonder what and why I was photographing. I even allowed some GGB employees to look through the camera. They were so surprised by my framing. “Very clever”, they commented. After making several frames and finishing, I proceeded to he GGB office looking for the GGBHTD Public Affairs Director. I was told that she would not be in for several more hours as she was on a film shoot up at the north end of the GGB. Upon leaving, I left behind my business card and proceeded to search out more possible photos during this brief moment of good light. The day ended with a few more frames being exposed but nothing like the communications dish photo. I knew this was special. And most importantly I knew it would not be a “postcard”!

Several weeks later, in Rochester, NY, I processed my digital files from that shoot. I really wanted to study the communications dish photo. I liked what I saw. In my heart it lived beyond the moment of capture. The position of the dish, in a foreground dominant stance, occupying 80% of the frame pleased me. The photo wasn’t perfect – as much as I liked the tree shadows in the dish, they were a difficult read – the small portion of the GGB in the upper right of the frame was a bit too small for me as well as several millimeters too close to the edge of the dish. Oh well, not much I could do about that now. I was able to reduce the appearance of dust and dirt on the dish by careful use of the “clone tool”. That helped the dish to have a bit more visual presence. The more I worked with the image, the more I liked it.
I was so excited by it, that I decided to share my “cleverly” framed photo of the GGB with the folks at the GGBHTD Public Affairs Office. I sent them an electronic file.

What happened next totally caught me off guard! The next day I received an email from the Public Affairs Director of the GGBHTD admonishing me
for making this photo! “What right did I have to make this photo without a GGB permit? You must remove this from your files and not show this photograph!” “We will follow legal avenues should you disregard our request.”

I could not believe what I was reading. I was expecting a congratulatory response on how “clever” of a photo this was (IMHO). I was shocked.
I felt like a criminal! Clearly, an unexpected turn. What right did the GGBHTD have to tell me to eradicate this photo from my files? For a while,
I was dumbfounded by this. After some careful consideration of the facts of the event and in speaking with friends, I came to the conclusion that I did not do anything improper or illegal. The GGBHTD had no authority to order me to desist from using this photograph. I made this from a public sidewalk. I did not use an extraordinary lens to “visually sneak “ onto GGBHTD property (there are laws against using a telephoto lens to gain visual access to subjects in a private place, from public property) – Think “paparazzi” ! Even the GGBHTD should be able to note that I used a wide-angle lens from a very close distance. The dish was on the outside edge of their property abutting a public sidewalk.

I informed them of those facts and indicated that I felt I had done no wrong and had not trespassed in order to make this photograph. In addition, this image was made for Fine Art exhibition purposes. It is NOT a commercial image and really has no commercial viability.

We live in complex times!

22
Aug 2016
AUTHOR braydee
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Gunther Cartwright – Industrial Blues

Gordy Fine Art and Framing Company will celebrate First Thursday, August 4th from 5 – 8 pm with an opening reception for Industrial Blues, an exhibit of landscape photography by Gunther Cartwright. The artist will be on hand to engage with viewers throughout the evening and will speak briefly to the audience about his work at 6:15. Light refreshments will be served and the public is invited to attend.

Cartwright’s landscapes exquisitely capture the details of industry that form the backdrop of life in today’s modern world. About his interest in this subject matter, Cartwright explains, “The power lines, telephone poles, fences and industrial structures are a part of my daily visual experience. They are not in my way. I see them as elements of the landscape. They are there and they make their visual ‘sound.’ I am not interested in the picturesque but rather the formal arrangements of elements and color within the landscape.” His eye for vivid color and graphic compositions often draw unexpected connections among things seen in the everyday landscape, transforming banal and rarely celebrated visual moments into striking works of art.

Cartwright holds a Master of Fine Arts degree from the renowned Visual Studies Workshop in Rochester, New York. He is currently Professor Emeritus of Applied Photography at the Rochester Institute of Technology, School of Photographic Arts and Sciences. An active lecturer and exhibitor, Cartwright has presented throughout Europe and the United States. He is a recipient of a Polaroid Corporation Photographer’s Grant and a New York State Council on the Arts Public Service Grant (CAPS). He has exhibited internationally in many one-man and group shows, including at the Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C., the George Eastman Museum, Rochester, NY, the National Museum of Photography, Bradford, England, The Photographer’s Gallery, London, England, and at Photokina, Köln, Germany.

Industrial Blues may also be viewed through the end of August during regular business hours: Monday through Friday, 9 am – 5:30 pm, Saturday, 9 am – 3 pm.

28
Jul 2016
AUTHOR braydee
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Gilding Demonstration & Shop Tours

Step back into the 17th century with us!

Join us Saturday afternoon, June 25th from 1 – 3 pm for a public gilding demonstration and tours through the back rooms of our shop.

Few people know about what goes on regularly in the back rooms of our shop space, restoring and reproducing antique frames for collectors and museum clients. This summer we have a number of projects in process that illustrate almost every aspect of antique restoration and reproduction that GFAF is capable of, including gold leafing, hand-carving, casting, burnishing, and antiquing. Often, these projects involve historical research, custom millwork, and methods of material application that are centuries old. We use simple materials & simple tools. Rabbit skin glue, chalk, clay, wood, wax, water, and 22 K gold leaf. Knives, gouges, steel wool, fine sandpaper, and a “gilders tip” made of squirrel hair.

The craft of gold leaf gilding goes back over 4,000 years to Northern Africa where gold foil was applied to wood to give the appearance of being made of solid gold. The methods of gilding used today are rooted in ancient Egypt and were later refined during the Renaissance.

Gold leaf is defined as thin sheets of gold, silver or less-precious metals, pounded down into “leaves” nearly 1/250,000 of an inch thick. The variety of genuine gold can differ in values from deep gold (23-24K) to lemon gold (18K), pale gold (16K), and white gold (12K), which are alloyed with small amounts of silver and/or copper.

Gold leafing is a generalized term used to group the three most common methods for applying gold to a prepared surface: water gilding, oil gilding, and what is commonly referred to as metal leafing. Throughout the ages the process of gold leafing has been used to create beautiful works of art, sculpture, and architecture.

22
Jun 2016
AUTHOR braydee
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Summer Invitational

Gordy Fine Art and Framing Company will celebrate First Thursday, June 2nd from 5 – 8 pm with an opening reception for the gallery’s third annual Summer Invitational. The exhibit will feature work by several area artists who will be on hand to engage with viewers. Light refreshments will be served and the public is invited to attend.

The Summer Invitational is designed to introduce some of the best new work our region has to offer by exclusively exhibiting artists not currently represented by GFAF. This refreshing shift in the gallery’s routine brings together artists from throughout Central Indiana and features oil painting, sculpture, furniture, photography, watercolor, and jewelry. The exhibit will be on view for two months through the end of July, offering visitors an extended opportunity to experience fresh, new art from beyond the Muncie scene.

Exhibitors include Hannah Barnes, Jasmine D’Angelo, Suzanne Dittenber, Holly Lay, Tim Miller, and Noelle Weigand.

Light refreshments will be served, and the public is invited to attend. A brief talk at 6:15 will introduce the exhibit and artists in attendance.

Margie Prim – The Thick of It

Gordy Fine Art and Framing Company will celebrate First Thursday, May 5th from 5 – 8 pm with an opening reception for The Thick of It, oil paintings by Margie Prim. The exhibit will feature several recent paintings by the local artist who will be on hand to engage with viewers. A short talk about Prim’s work will be given at 6:15 pm. Light refreshments will be served and the public is invited to attend.

Margie Prim delivers quiet scenes with a bold painting technique. From several feet away, all is calm in Prim’s still life and landscape paintings. Upon closer inspection gestural swipes and heavy dabs of color reveal a much more powerful and passionate approach. The technique is known as “impasto,” where the artist often uses a palette knife to apply paint to the canvas so thick that it projects out from the surface.

“Inspiration comes to me by what I see, whether it be plein air or still life,” the quiet artist explains. “Using color, from grays to brights, is always an adventure for me.”

Known for quiet plein air landscape and still life paintings wild with impasto and bold color detail, Margie Prim began her art career in the 1960s in Oklahoma by taking painting lessons. She laid her brushes down until the early 1990s when she again took lessons from Walt Lewis and at the Stan Nossett Art School. Margie continued her studies through memberships in the Minnetrista Art Guild and the Indiana Plein Air Painters. Where many artists work from sketches or photographs in the comfort of their studio, plein air painters work outside, on location, to create their paintings. Prim is adept in both methods.

Prim has shown in the Minnetrista Annual, the Richmond Art Museum Annual, Indiana State Fair, the Women’s Commission Art Exhibit, Redtail Conservancy Open Spaces Exhibit, and the Hoosier Salon. She has won awards at several exhibits and held several one woman exhibits in the region.

 

03
May 2016
AUTHOR braydee
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