Natural Influences: Two Hoosiers, Nature, and Their Art

From topographically inspired jewelry by Lisa Walsh to floral designed silks by Carrie Wright, the influence of nature will be celebrated during Natural Influences: Two Hoosiers, Nature, and Their Art.

Carrie Wright, a Muncie silk painter and newly minted Indiana Artisan, will be sharing her beautiful pieces of wearable art.  Wright gives specific attention to several details, such as: where the design elements are likely to fall on the body when the scarf is worn; an appropriate color pallet within the design with careful consideration for the occasion or outfit for which the scarf might be worn; a balanced combination of floral and graphic elements maintaining visual tension and interest.  Wright’s creativity is nurtured by combining the clean design disciplines of the Japanese kimono textile creators and the forward-thinking creativity of European designers.

“I was born and raised amid the fields in northern Delaware County”, says Wright. “I’ve always been inspired by the beauty of Indiana landscapes, fields that stretch to the horizons of both the rising and setting sun. Much of my work is influenced by the flora of the area combined in some way with a bold graphic design element to help balance the piece and prohibit it from becoming flowery or fussy.”

 

Lisa Walsh, a jewelry designer from Lafayette, will be showcasing pieces from her Topography Series. Walsh uses enamels and mixed metals to portray accurate contour lines from topographical maps.  Conceptualized in 2015, this series has received four consecutive Arts in the Parks grants from the Indiana Arts Commission.  The Topography Series includes work featuring Clifty Falls and Spring Mill State Park in southern Indiana, and recently expanded to include areas of Shenandoah National Park where Walsh was artist-in-residence in 2018.

Walsh’s influence is a “fascination with topographical maps which I have had since studying fire science many years ago, but hadn’t incorporated them into my work until relatively recently.  Topography and jewelry are such an unusual pairing that it often opens discussions that lead into important land and conservation issues,” she says.  “Jewelry is the ultimate traveling art, and as such, a great medium for encouraging dialogue between people.”