Natural Influences: Two Hoosiers, Nature, and Their Art

From topographically inspired jewelry by Lisa Walsh to floral designed silks by Carrie Wright, the influence of nature will be celebrated during Natural Influences: Two Hoosiers, Nature, and Their Art.

Carrie Wright, a Muncie silk painter and newly minted Indiana Artisan, will be sharing her beautiful pieces of wearable art.  Wright gives specific attention to several details, such as: where the design elements are likely to fall on the body when the scarf is worn; an appropriate color pallet within the design with careful consideration for the occasion or outfit for which the scarf might be worn; a balanced combination of floral and graphic elements maintaining visual tension and interest.  Wright’s creativity is nurtured by combining the clean design disciplines of the Japanese kimono textile creators and the forward-thinking creativity of European designers.

“I was born and raised amid the fields in northern Delaware County”, says Wright. “I’ve always been inspired by the beauty of Indiana landscapes, fields that stretch to the horizons of both the rising and setting sun. Much of my work is influenced by the flora of the area combined in some way with a bold graphic design element to help balance the piece and prohibit it from becoming flowery or fussy.”

 

Lisa Walsh, a jewelry designer from Lafayette, will be showcasing pieces from her Topography Series. Walsh uses enamels and mixed metals to portray accurate contour lines from topographical maps.  Conceptualized in 2015, this series has received four consecutive Arts in the Parks grants from the Indiana Arts Commission.  The Topography Series includes work featuring Clifty Falls and Spring Mill State Park in southern Indiana, and recently expanded to include areas of Shenandoah National Park where Walsh was artist-in-residence in 2018.

Walsh’s influence is a “fascination with topographical maps which I have had since studying fire science many years ago, but hadn’t incorporated them into my work until relatively recently.  Topography and jewelry are such an unusual pairing that it often opens discussions that lead into important land and conservation issues,” she says.  “Jewelry is the ultimate traveling art, and as such, a great medium for encouraging dialogue between people.”

Margie Prim: Still Lifes and Landscapes

Gordy Fine Art and Framing Company will celebrate the brink of summer with the  fresh and beautiful work of Margie Prim during May’s First Thursday on May 2, 2019 from 5:00 to 8:00.  Margie will give a short talk at 6:15.  Light refreshments will be served, and the public is invited to attend.

Margie’s heavy strokes swipe the canvas with dabs of bold color to create beautiful still lifes and peaceful landscapes. This quiet artist brings out her passion for life through canvases which capture scenes from East Central Indiana.  This Muncie artist’s inspirations may be found as easily down an alley, by the White River, or out in a farmer’s field.  “I just get in my car and I drive,” Margie explains.

Margie Prim began her art career in the 1960s in Oklahoma by taking painting lessons. She arrived in Muncie in the 1970s.  She laid her brushes down until the early 1990s when she started taking various art classes offered by community organizations such as the YMCA. She took lessons from Walt Lewis at the Stan Nossett School of Fine Art in Muncie. Margie, the perpetual student, continues learning through her involvement with the New Richmond Group and Indiana Plein Air Painters.

Margie considers herself both a studio and plein air artist and is adept in both methods.  She enjoys, especially in colder months, to work from sketches or photographs in the comfort of her studio.  As a plein air painter she works outside, on location, to create her paintings.

Margie has shown in the Minnetrista Annual, the Richmond Art Museum Annual, and Red-Tail Land Conservancy Open Spaces Exhibit. She has won  several awards and held several one woman exhibits in the region.  In early 2019, Margie won honorable mention in the Madison County Art Show. Her works have been included in the Indiana Waterways Project and the Women’s Commission Art Exhibit.

The exhibition will remain on view with works for sale through Saturday June 1.  Gordy Fine Art and Framing Company promotes talented artists, provides appraisals, and offers expert design and craftsmanship for framing and displaying treasured family possessions and works of art. Business hours: Monday through Friday, 9 am – 5:30 pm, Saturday, 9 am – 3 pm. Gordy Fine Art and Framing Company is located at 224 East Main Street, next door to Muncie Civic Theatre.  For more information, visit www.gordyframing.com or call 765-284-8422.

An Honest Assessment

What happens when you graduate from art school? And more specifically, the art department of a state school?

Maybe you go to Pratt. Maybe you move back in with mom and dad. Or maybe you weigh your options, like me, between casual advice sessions from your best ex-professors.  Over a shared Oude Tart last fall, Jacinda Russell reiterated the most popular sentiment: “You need to go to grad school.” She followed that with, “You. And Amelia Morris,” company I’m still not sure I deserve.

Like so many other BFA degree recipients, I could be making americanos, pizza deliveries, and mixed drinks for my successors. Instead, since graduating in 2011, I have been trusted by the Gordy family to manage GFAF gallery operations and create opportunity after opportunity for others in that familiar “what now?” boat.

The newest of these is our Small Exhibit Series, an exciting addition to downtown Muncie’s array of monthly art shows. February marks the launch of the exhibition program which has been tailored to support emerging area artists and simultaneously foster a wider knowledge of and appreciation for current art trends among our patrons.

The inaugural exhibition An Honest Assessment features photographs by the aforementioned needs-to-go-to-grad-schooler, Amelia Morris. Aptly titled, this body of work addresses what she likes to call her “post-grad blues.”  Ten captioned self-portraits reveal Morris’ feelings of anxiety and inadequacy following her graduation in 2008. Despite loosely referring to this period of her life as a “sabbatical,” Morris continues to make photography a priority. Her photographs are included in Ball State University’s and the Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender, and Reproduction’s collections. She is an active member of the Postcard Collective, an international artist postcard exchange group. Amelia is also a 2013 Robert D. Beckmann, Jr. Emerging Artist Fellow through the Arts Council of Indianapolis.

Well, ain't that hardcore!

Well, ain’t that hardcore!

 

An Honest Assessment is on view in our newly christened Nook gallery through March 4th. More information about Amelia and her work can be found on her website www.thanksandsorryphotos.com.