Kendalville Blacksmith Shop

Let GORDY help tell your STORY

This photo was taken in Kendalville, Indiana around 1900 and shows the blacksmiths, farriers, and stable hand that helped G. Bertsch shoe animals. In fact, a horse pops his head out the door. We believe the gentleman in the bowler hat to be the owner, a grandfather to our client’s husband. Our client needed three of these photos framed as Christmas gifts for her husband and two sons.

We worked with our client to craft an ideal framing solution to help showcase this family story. A dark beige mat compliments the warm tones of the sepia photograph. The black core or edging of the mat helps the dark areas in the photo (such as the interior of the building and the darker paint under the white lettering) pop out which visually draws you into the photo. A thin wood frame laminated to resemble old rusty iron edging with nails was selected. Shoeing animals whether it be a horse or ox was dirty, smelly, dusty and hot work. Metal shoes were fit and nailed onto the hooves of animals. This frame gives recognition to the materials used in shoeing, thus visually complements the story the photo tells.

 

14
Mar 2019
AUTHOR Barbara Schafer
CATEGORY

Portfolio

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Hurley Goodall: Muncie Icon

Gordy Fine Art & Framing Company will open the exhibition Hurley Goodall: Muncie Icon, Thursday October 4, 2018 from 5 – 9 pm .

Photographs will be drawn from the Ball State University’s Archives and Special Collections, a department of Ball State University Libraries.  Copies will be sold to benefit the Delaware County Historical Society’s effort to commission a statue of Muncie’s great African American leader.

Gordy owners Barbara and Carl Schafer are working in partnership with Michael Szajewski,  Assistant Dean for Digital Scholarship and Special Collections at the Ball State University Libraries.  Selected photographs will explore the African American community in Muncie and focus on Mr. Goodall.

The exhibition will concentrate on memorable events and people in photographs from the Black Muncie History Collection which was presented to Ball State by Mr. Goodall in 1980.  “This exhibit will honor Hurley Goodall’s vast impact on Muncie and East Central Indiana,” says Szajewski, “highlighting the rich cultural fabric and history of Muncie’s African American community that Goodall helped to both document and empower.”  Through sales of the photographs, this month-long exhibition will raise money for the statue and generate a new appreciation for Mr. Goodall as Muncie’s first African American firefighter,  first African American school board member, and first African American legislator.

Hurley Goodall: Muncie Icon will be displayed through the month of October.

 

Color Ocean/Color Land

Abstract painter Suzanne Lambert and GFAF owner and artist Genny Gordy to exhibit together in the gallery throughout the month of September.

Suzanne Lambert is well-known for stunning mixed-media canvases of poured, dripped, and sprayed paints. The former dancer seems to transfer dance moves into her work; colors flow and are embellished with staccato beats, swirls, and arabesques. Titles give hints to the artist’s meaning or refer to the place of inspiration. That could be the Ohio River Valley or the French countryside; Lambert splits her residence/studio space between two continents. “My intention is to visually convey, through color, tone, and composition, the feeling and essence of places…I visit, the people I experience.” She continues, “Energy of life moves me; I wish to bring this feeling to the viewer, to touch them, and, perhaps, to lift the soul…” Lambert will fill the main gallery with new works and speak about her work during the opening reception on September 5, 2013, at 6:15 PM.

Where Ever You Are, You Find the Sun

Genny Gordy will hang an exhibit of photos and watercolors in the Nook gallery. Titled, “”iGarden,” the show exposes the acre of land in town that Gordy and husband, Brian, somewhat wildly maintain and that Genny’s iPhone camera readily captures. Fruit trees and grape vines share space with raised-bed and traditional vegetable gardens. Flowers and herbs fill every view; artworks dot the landscape – a Kim Anderson bird bath, a Matt Lynch sculpture, and an Amish fertility sign painted by a friend. A cabin, possibly 80 years old, serves as Genny’s garden shed. A blue desk in the shade is used as a garden bench and is the background for many photos. A small bridge connects upper and lower yards where wildlife, from deer to heron to flying squirrel, has visited through the years. “It is where I reconnect with the ground beneath my feet and work out thoughts and muscles,” offers Genny. “Every day, I step out my back door into the wonder of the gardens and return renewed. These images are my attempt to share that colorful magic with others.” Gordy will speak about her work at 6:30 PM opening night.

Vegetable Basket on Blue

The exhibits continue through September 30th and may also be viewed during normal business hours: Monday through Friday, 9 to 5:30; Saturday, 9 to 3, or by appointment.

An Honest Assessment

What happens when you graduate from art school? And more specifically, the art department of a state school?

Maybe you go to Pratt. Maybe you move back in with mom and dad. Or maybe you weigh your options, like me, between casual advice sessions from your best ex-professors.  Over a shared Oude Tart last fall, Jacinda Russell reiterated the most popular sentiment: “You need to go to grad school.” She followed that with, “You. And Amelia Morris,” company I’m still not sure I deserve.

Like so many other BFA degree recipients, I could be making americanos, pizza deliveries, and mixed drinks for my successors. Instead, since graduating in 2011, I have been trusted by the Gordy family to manage GFAF gallery operations and create opportunity after opportunity for others in that familiar “what now?” boat.

The newest of these is our Small Exhibit Series, an exciting addition to downtown Muncie’s array of monthly art shows. February marks the launch of the exhibition program which has been tailored to support emerging area artists and simultaneously foster a wider knowledge of and appreciation for current art trends among our patrons.

The inaugural exhibition An Honest Assessment features photographs by the aforementioned needs-to-go-to-grad-schooler, Amelia Morris. Aptly titled, this body of work addresses what she likes to call her “post-grad blues.”  Ten captioned self-portraits reveal Morris’ feelings of anxiety and inadequacy following her graduation in 2008. Despite loosely referring to this period of her life as a “sabbatical,” Morris continues to make photography a priority. Her photographs are included in Ball State University’s and the Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender, and Reproduction’s collections. She is an active member of the Postcard Collective, an international artist postcard exchange group. Amelia is also a 2013 Robert D. Beckmann, Jr. Emerging Artist Fellow through the Arts Council of Indianapolis.

Well, ain't that hardcore!

Well, ain’t that hardcore!

 

An Honest Assessment is on view in our newly christened Nook gallery through March 4th. More information about Amelia and her work can be found on her website www.thanksandsorryphotos.com.